In life we are in death…

So reads the a line from the old Requiem Mass. It certainly has been a vivid reality during the month of March, when several of my friends lost close loved ones and my own life was touched by the deaths of my dear friend Nora, and my friend’s Uncle Theo (written about, below).

I think about the nature of death – I’m not so much afraid of death as I am of dying (how it could happen, that is). My maternal grandmother had a deep dread of becoming incapacitated and winding up in a nursing home, where she had seen so many family members wind up – “I just hope it’s quick,” she said. And when the time came, it was. She sent my grandfather out to the garden to get an eggplant for lunch, and while he was out there she suffered a massive event of some description; she died moments after Papa found her lying on the hallway floor.

The fact is, we take what we’re given. God hasn’t spoiled us yet by sending us emails and polls asking us how we prefer to go – He determines the time and the method, and that is it.

What we have to do between now and then is to prepare. And one of the ways we prepare is by visiting the sick and dying, which is a Work of Mercy. It’s an obscenity that any of our family members should approach death alone, untended and unsupported by our love.

“I want to remember Granny as she was,” is just a flimsy cover for abject selfishness. We owe our parents, our siblings, our extended families and our friends – even strangers, if we happen to have them placed in our paths – with the very tenderness and compassion that we, ourselves, would have extended to us as we approach the hour of meeting God face to face.

Death is a part of life – it’s the end of the finite and the beginning of Eternity. We experienced its parallel in being born – dying the security and familiarity of the womb to be born into our life as independent creatures. This is only the prep school for Eternity, after all.

No need to be squeamish. No need to recoil. Comfort the afflicted – visit the sick and dying.

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2 thoughts on “In life we are in death…

  1. What a great reminder Laura. It is similar to what I’ve been teaching my CCD classes, albeit I added a selfish motive. I’ve been trying to impress on them the importance of praying for the souls in pugatory. I told them that if they developed a “habit” of praying for those souls then, hopefully, they would remember to pray for me when the time comes.

  2. “”I want to remember Granny as she was,” is just a flimsy cover for abject selfishness” Yes and equally selfish is when Granny says, “I don’t want the grandkids to remember me like this” and pretends that asking to be assisted in her own suicide is dying with dignity.

    Dignity upholds a good for the person as an end in themselves and according to their nature as a unique, unrepeatable human being (thank you Bl.JPII for Love & Responsibility where he articulates true personhood).

    P.S. All the best with your writing project.

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